Bat Surveys: Our PROCESS

We're here to guide you through the process of completing bat surveys, from initial roost assessment through to detailed mitigation strategies.

STAGE ONE

Firstly, send us the details of the site and we will send you a free no obligation quotation.

STAGE TWO

If we get the go ahead we will visit the site and if a bat roost is found present then a minimum of three surveys will be required.

STAGE THREE

A report is then produced detailing the type of roost present, the ecologial importance of the roost and surrounding habitat and detailing of avoidance mitigation / compensation measures required.

STAGE FOUR

Planning permission and european protected species mitigation license to be applied for.

STAGE FIVE

If planning permission and eps license is granted then the development can move forward.

APPROVAL

Once all of the above has been completed then the project will be approved!

ARE YOU IN NEED OF A BAT SURVEY?

Here at Wharton Tree & Ecology Consultants we are experienced
and would be more than happy to help with your project.

ecology-icon

Why not see what other ecology
services we have to offer?

Take me to Ecology

RELATED CASE STUDIES

Related Services

  • Sin nonsequi tes abor aborempos autasas as ma nessus nobitis dolor molorpoporro et ressedi ommosas eaquas astassam readi onfa dalie at assedi ommosa. Sin nonsequi tes abor aborempos autasas as ma nessus nobitis dolor molorpoporro et.

  • Sin nonsequi tes abor aborempos autasas as ma nessus nobitis dolor molorpoporro et ressedi ommosas eaquas astassam readi onfa dalie at assedi ommosa. Sin nonsequi tes abor aborempos autasas as ma nessus nobitis dolor molorpoporro et.

FAQ'S

We’re here to guide you through the process of completing bat surveys, from initial roost assessment through to detailed mitigation strategies.

In most cases, a contractor will only carry out practical tree work such as pruning, felling, stump grinding etc. Consultants are generally required to hold a higher qualification and advise on a range of matters such as tree health and safety, trees in relation to development and tree law / legislation.

Ivy itself does not pose an immediate threat to trees. In some instances ivy can obscure detailed tree inspection, it which case it may need to be removed.  However, where wildlife is a priority, it can be beneficial to retain ivy.

The first step should always be to approach the neighbour and try to resolve the issue amicably. If this cannot be achieved, there are a number of scenarios where something can be done. In this instance advice should be sought from an arboricultural consultant.

Trees provide a range of benefits to any development. However, without proper consideration during design there is potential for conflict between trees and planning proposals. Where there are trees within influencing distance of a development, the local planning authority may ask for an arboricultural impact assessment or method statement to show that trees have been properly considered.  The implications go further when trees are protected by a TPO or the site is within a Conservation Area. It is vital to consider trees from the outset to prevent any unnecessary negative impacts.